Souvenirs de Guerre, Notes de guerre, Journeés Mémorables by BROUTIER,…

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Souvenirs de Guerre, Notes de guerre, Journeés Mémorables [Manuscript diaries of the Somme, Verdun etc.]

1918. Handwritten diary of World War I of a French officer Auguste Broutier. Handwritten diary of a French Officer of 125 Infantry, Sector 66, 20 section. Specialties: Observer, Grenadier, Canon VB, Bombardier, Carpenter, Carpenter. Cuisto. 1914-1919. Three volumes each with a red label on the front cover with handwritten titles and with squared paper. Different sizes and covers in black leather and imitation leather. Handwritten Entries Vol 1 34pp. Vol II 19 pp of manuscript entries, Vol III 11pp of entries, all volumes written largely in ink in a neat and tidy hand. Two volumes with pressed flowers, including poppies. Vol III without a free front cover page, allowing the cover to separate from the block of text, although still securely attached. The diaries, written after the fact, recount memorable days from 1914 onwards, interspersed with longer accounts of key actions; 4 pp, Phase of the Battle of Verdun; 2 pp, Attaque de Champagne April 16, 1917; Souvenir of Coussaint. November 1, 1915, 3pp "La reléve d'un trenchée en Hiver"; Souvenir d'automne October 24, 1915 Infirmary; 4 pp, February 5, 1918 Done in the village of Lébricourt, advanced point of the French lines. Numerous white sheets in volumes II and III. We have a translation of several extracts. One of the things that most excited us about these diaries, is that the pressed flowers include poppies, perhaps taken from Verdun or the Somme around the time of the battle. The most moving symbol of the battlefields of Flanders. 145 x 95 mm (5¾ x 3¾ inches).

Extracts: "The relief of a trench in winter 1914-1915." "Bad weather, cold, so dark that you could not see a metre in front of you, & the machine guns. It was necessary to forget the hard work of the lucrative professions. Night approached, the chef poured soup and bread, then smoked beef, a small ration each & to finish the meal a litre of good wine. The captain arrived, the chiefs of each section quickly prepare a silent whistle and the procession sets off again in the darkness of the night. At this point all conversations cease. Everyone is in control and is plunged into complete silence." They have arrived in the area of the fire zone - no cigarettes so so as not to show their position to the Bosche... "we had difficulty moving forward, the road had countless ruts which had filled with water, and slowed our advance and we did not want to take a bath , which would not be favorable because of the cold. You had to go fast so as not to get trapped. The weather persists every day, the water falls without stopping. We are stuck in the mud (up to our ankles). Finally, after many superhuman efforts, we arrive at the communication trench. Here we feel a certain ease, we will soon arrive." The diaries report firsthand the horrors of the Western Front, from the point of view of the French soldiers. Broutier left for the front in August 1914 and was soon injured and hospitalized. In 1915, he fought in Belgium and spent from January to March in the trenches. He writes that they were relieved by the English, spending some six days in liaison with them. In September and October, Broutier is engaged in the battle of Loos, and is wounded a second time, sent to the hospital of Lourdes. There is a long description of his stay there. He tells of his departure for the depot, the passage of his commission, his arrival at his parents and his return to the depot in Poitiers. In 1916, Auguste was in Verdun, and he provides a four-page account. Below is a translation of an extract on March 20, "the enemy tries to turn our flank to the left in the Malancourt Avocourt sector. On May 20, they entered the Bois de Malancourt. on the 22nd they established a toe hold at Haucourt. On the 28th they attacked on the Malancourt front but without success. We attacked in our turn on the 29th and re-took a part of the Avocourt wood. On May 31, the Germans completely occupied the village of Malancourt. On April 1, they launched themselves on the fort of Vaux." On the night of the 24th day / 25th May, at Villers in Belgium, he wrote "We are under a rolling barrage of fire, it is appalling. It is very bad for the Macchabies (the Jews). The whole division is in line, we fear an attack from the Fritzes ". In August 1918, Broutier wrote "Boche planes bombed the villages. 17 dead and 35 wounded... What a loss was caused to the Macchabies. We buried them as we went along. We had to collect considerable equipment, batteries, machine gunes etc." On August 8, 1918, the newspapers recorded the" great Somme offensive" alongside the British 4th Army. At 5 o'clock in the morning a terrible barrage begins, "of all caliber". At 6 o'clock in the morning "the waves separate and simultaneously the advance is rapid" the first prisoners immediately pour in. We are thrown against their batteries, "les tireurs sont cloues a leurs pieces", literally the gun crews are nailed to their pieces. The writing is lively and familiar, giving a strong picture of events in a rather dashing style. He writes of the Armistice "Le Novembre le 11 a 11 heiress du matin suspension des hostilities = armistice a Seloigne Belgique" Journal manuscrit de la Première Guerre mondiale d'un officier français Auguste Broutier. Journal manuscrit d'un Officier Français de 125 Infanterie, Secteur 66, section 20. Spécialités : Observateur, Grenadier, Canon VB, Bombardier, Charpentier, Charpentier. Cuisto. 1914-1919. Trois volumes chacun avec une étiquette rouge sur le premier plat avec des titres manuscrits et avec du papier quadrillé. Différentes tailles et housses en cuir noir et simili cuir. Entrées manuscrites Vol 1 34pp. Vol II 19 pp d'entrées manuscrites, Vol III 11pp d'entrées, tous les volumes écrits en grande partie à l'encre d'une main propre et bien rangée. Deux volumes à fleurs pressées, dont des coquelicots. Vol III sans page de couverture libre, permettant à la couverture de se séparer du bloc de texte, bien que toujours solidement attachée. Les journaux, écrits après coup, racontent des jours mémorables à partir de 1914, entrecoupés de récits plus longs d'actions clés ; 4 pp, Phase de la bataille de Verdun ; 2 pp, Attaque de Champagne 16 avril 1917 ; Souvenir de Coussaint. 1er novembre 1915, 3pp "La relave d'un tranchée en Hiver"; Souvenir d'automne 24 octobre 1915 Infirmerie; 4 pp, 5 février 1918 Fait au village de Lébricourt, point avancé des lignes françaises. Nombreuses feuilles blanches dans les tomes II et III. Nous avons une traduction de plusieurs extraits. L'une des choses qui nous a le plus enthousiasmés dans ces journaux, c'est que les fleurs pressées comprennent des coquelicots, peut-être pris à Verdun ou dans la Somme à l'époque de la bataille. Le symbole le plus émouvant des champs de bataille de Flandre. 145 x 95 mm - Sur notre site vous trouverez plus d'informations / extraits

Book ID: 3218
Category: Military
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