Search

Criteria:
  • Category = Cartography
  • Historisch - geographischer Atlas der alten Welt. by KIEPERT, H.
    KIEPERT, H.
    Historisch - geographischer Atlas der alten Welt. Zum Schulgbrauch bearbeitet und mit erläuternden Bemerkungen begleitet.

    Weimar: Geographisches Institut, 1858. The 12th revised edition. Hardback. Contemporary dark brown half leather binding. Complete with 32 pages of text in German (arranged in three columns), and 16 coloured steel engraved maps. Binding is rubbed at edges, but sound. Gilt stamped title to spine, and spine is rubbed. Text pages are somewhat foxed, but maps apear unaffected. Overall good. 255 x 335 mm (10 x 13¼ inches). 12. verbesserte Auflage. Gebunden. Dunkelbrauner Halbledereinband der Zeit. Komplett mit 32 Textseiten in deutscher Sprache (in drei Spalten geordnet) und 16 farbigen Stahlstich Karten. Einband an den Kanten berieben, aber intakt. Rückentitel goldgeprägt, Rücken berieben. Textseiten sind etwas stockfleckig, aber Karten erscheinen unbeeinflusst. Insgesamt gut. 255 x 335 mm

    Book ID: 3553
    View basket More details Price: £45.00
  • Map of Awaji province (淡路国, Awaji no kuni, old spelling 淡道), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of Awaji province (淡路国, Awaji no kuni, old spelling 淡道), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Awaji province (淡路国, Awaji no kuni, old spelling 淡道) is a former province of Japan, on the island Awaji, between the islands Honshu and Shikoku. it is part of the former region Nankaidō and is in the present day prefecture Hyogo. it is also called Tanshu (淡州). Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Awaji province (淡路国, Awaji no kuni, old spelling 淡道) is a former province of Japan, on the island Awaji, between the islands Honshu and Shikoku. it is part of the former region Nankaidō and is in the present day prefecture Hyogo. it is also called Tanshu (淡州). Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte de la province d'Awaji (淡路国, Awaji no kuni, ancienne orthographe 淡道) est une ancienne province du Japon, sur l'île Awaji, entre les îles Honshu et Shikoku. il fait partie de l'ancienne région de Nankaidō et se trouve dans l'actuelle préfecture de Hyogo. on l'appelle aussi Tanshu (淡州). Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. La carte mesure 215 par 320 mm (8½ par 12½ pouces). Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1766
    View basket More details Price: £85.00
  • Map of Bingo (備後国, Bingo no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of Bingo (備後国, Bingo no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Bingo province. 備後国, (Bingo no kuni) is a former province of Japan, lying on the Japanese internal sea on the side of west Honshu. it is west of the present day prefecture Hiroshima. Bingo lis next to the provinces Hoki, Izumo, Iwami and Aki. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Bingo province. 備後国, (Bingo no kuni) is a former province of Japan, lying on the Japanese internal sea on the side of west Honshu. it is west of the present day prefecture Hiroshima. Bingo lis next to the provinces Hoki, Izumo, Iwami and Aki. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte de la province de Bingo.備後国, (Bingo no kuni) est une ancienne province du Japon, située sur la mer intérieure japonaise du côté ouest de Honshu. il est à l'ouest de l'actuelle préfecture d'Hiroshima. Bingo se trouve à côté des provinces Hoki, Izumo, Iwami et Aki. Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. La carte mesure 215 par 320 mm (8½ par 12½ pouces). Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1770
    View basket More details Price: £85.00
  • Map of Bitchū (備中国, Bitchū no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of Bitchū (備中国, Bitchū no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Bitchū (備中国, Bitchū no kuni) is a former province of Japan, located on the Japanese internal sea of west Honshu. it occupied the area west of the present day prefecture Okayama. Bitchu is next to the provinces Hoki, Mimasaka, Bizen and Bingo. is a former province of Japan, on the island Awaji, between the islands Honshu and Shikoku. it is part of the former region Nankaidō and is in the present day prefecture Hyogo. it is also called Tanshu (淡州). Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Bitchū (備中国, Bitchū no kuni) is a former province of Japan, located on the Japanese internal sea of west Honshu. it occupied the area west of the present day prefecture Okayama. Bitchu is next to the provinces Hoki, Mimasaka, Bizen and Bingo. is a former province of Japan, on the island Awaji, between the islands Honshu and Shikoku. it is part of the former region Nankaidō and is in the present day prefecture Hyogo. it is also called Tanshu (淡州). Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte du Bitchū (備中国, Bitchū no kuni) est une ancienne province du Japon, située sur la mer intérieure japonaise de l'ouest Honshu. il occupait la zone à l'ouest de l'actuelle préfecture d'Okayama. Bitchu est à côté des provinces Hoki, Mimasaka, Bizen et Bingo. est une ancienne province du Japon, sur l'île Awaji, entre les îles Honshu et Shikoku. il fait partie de l'ancienne région de Nankaidō et se trouve dans l'actuelle préfecture de Hyogo. on l'appelle aussi Tanshu (淡州). Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. La carte mesure 215 par 320 mm (8½ par 12½ pouces). Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1767
    View basket More details Price: £80.00
  • Map of East Echigo (越後国, Echigo no kuni) , taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of East Echigo (越後国, Echigo no kuni) , taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the East Echigo no Kuni province of Japan. (越後国) Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. "A really fine and amply detailed map reflecting the highest credit upon the scientific attainment of the Japanese. It is the best map of Japan in existence and very rare in Europe; as it is not…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the East Echigo no Kuni province of Japan. (越後国) Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. "A really fine and amply detailed map reflecting the highest credit upon the scientific attainment of the Japanese. It is the best map of Japan in existence and very rare in Europe; as it is not allowed to be sold to foreigners". (Revue Orientale, 1869). Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte de la province orientale d'Echigo no Kuni au Japon. (越後国) Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur du papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. « Une carte vraiment fine et amplement détaillée reflétant le plus grand crédit sur les réalisations scientifiques des Japonais. C'est la meilleure carte du Japon existante et très rare en Europe ; car il n'est pas autorisé à être vendu à des étrangers ». (Revue Orientale, 1869). Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1742
    View basket More details Price: £85.00
  • Map of Kawachi (河内国, Kawachi no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of Kawachi (河内国, Kawachi no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Kawachi Province. 河内国, (Kawachi no kuni) is a former province of Japan, situated in the current prefecture Osaka. Kawachi was situated next to the provinces Kii, Izumi, Yamato, Settsu and Yamashiro. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Kawachi Province. 河内国, (Kawachi no kuni) is a former province of Japan, situated in the current prefecture Osaka. Kawachi was situated next to the provinces Kii, Izumi, Yamato, Settsu and Yamashiro. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte de la province de Kawachi.河内国, (Kawachi no kuni) est une ancienne province du Japon, située dans l'actuelle préfecture d'Osaka. Kawachi était situé à côté des provinces Kii, Izumi, Yamato, Settsu et Yamashiro. Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. La carte mesure 215 par 320 mm (8½ par 12½ pouces). Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1764
    View basket More details Price: £85.00
  • Map of Settsu Province (摂津国, Settsu no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of Settsu Province (摂津国, Settsu no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Settsu no Kuni province of Japan. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. "A really fine and amply detailed map reflecting the highest credit upon the scientific attainment of the Japanese. It is the best map of Japan in existence and very rare in Europe; as it is not allowed to…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Settsu no Kuni province of Japan. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. "A really fine and amply detailed map reflecting the highest credit upon the scientific attainment of the Japanese. It is the best map of Japan in existence and very rare in Europe; as it is not allowed to be sold to foreigners". (Revue Orientale, 1869). Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte de la province de Settsu no Kuni au Japon. Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. « Une carte vraiment fine et amplement détaillée reflétant le plus grand crédit sur les réalisations scientifiques des Japonais. C'est la meilleure carte du Japon existante et très rare en Europe ; car il n'est pas autorisé à être vendu à des étrangers ». (Revue Orientale, 1869). Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1740
    View basket More details Price: £85.00
  • Map of Tsushima (対馬国, Tsushima-no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of Tsushima (対馬国, Tsushima-no kuni), taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Tsushima province. 対馬国, Tsushima-no kuni is a former province of Japan, situated in the current prefecture Nagasaki. It was situated on the island of the same name. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the Tsushima province. 対馬国, Tsushima-no kuni is a former province of Japan, situated in the current prefecture Nagasaki. It was situated on the island of the same name. Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. Map measures 215 by 320mm (8½ by 12½ inches). A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte de la province de Tsushima.対馬国, Tsushima-no kuni est une ancienne province du Japon, située dans l'actuelle préfecture de Nagasaki. Il était situé sur l'île du même nom. Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. La carte mesure 215 par 320 mm (8½ par 12½ pouces). Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1761
    View basket More details Price: £90.00
  • Map of West Echigo province (越後国, Echigo no kuni) , taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version) by TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    TADATAKA, Ino (compiled by Aoo, Motonobu & Eirakuua, Toshiro.)
    Map of West Echigo province (越後国, Echigo no kuni) , taken from Kokugun Zenzu / Atlas of Japan (De luxe version)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the West Echigo no Kuni province of Japan. (越後国) Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. "A really fine and amply detailed map reflecting the highest credit upon the scientific attainment of the Japanese. It is the best map of Japan in existence and very rare in Europe; as it is not…

    (more)

    Japan: 1830. A map of the West Echigo no Kuni province of Japan. (越後国) Printed on two pages (fixed together) on rice paper. Produced as part of Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas of Japan), mapped and prepared by Ino Tadataka, and compiled after his death by Motonobu Aoo and Toshiro Eirakuua. This map is taken from the De-Luxe version of the map (the standard version was slightly smaller and printed on thinner paper). Contemporary colouring. A very nice clean copy. Strong colouring. No chips or tears. "A really fine and amply detailed map reflecting the highest credit upon the scientific attainment of the Japanese. It is the best map of Japan in existence and very rare in Europe; as it is not allowed to be sold to foreigners". (Revue Orientale, 1869). Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) was a Japanese surveyor and cartographer and is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Japan. Ino Tadataka was born in Kujukuri, a coastal village in Kazusa Province (Chiba Prefecture) at 17 he was adopted into the prosperous Ino clan. The Ino family were wealth rice merchantS and saki brewers based in Sawara (now a district of Katori, Chiba), a town in Shimo-Usa Province. Ino Tadataka served the family interests for nearly thirty-two years before turning his interests to mathematics, astronomy, and cartography. He moved to Edo (modern Tokyo) and there apprenticed himself to Takahashi Yoshitoki, a specialist in astronomy under the Tokugawa Shogunate. After five years of study he petitioned the Shogun for permission to map the coastline of Japan using modern techniques and his own money. The Shogun approved and Tadataka spent the next seventeen years surveying the country on foot. This monumental work resulted in a map and subsequent atlas of such extraordinary accuracy and detail that would be the definitive mapping of Japan for the next 100 years. The maps and atlases for which Ino Tadataka would be forever known were compiled by his friends and family and published approximately three years after his death. By the late 19th century Ino Tadataka's maps had become the standard for Japanese cartography and were avidly collected by wealthy merchants and bureaucrats throughout Japan. One such, a functionary in the Imperial household, actually managed to collect most of Ino Tadataka's surviving work which he stored in the Royal Palace. When the Palace was destroyed by fire in 1814 most of this prized collection went with it. Une carte de la province occidentale d'Echigo no Kuni au Japon. (越後国) Imprimé sur deux pages (fixées ensemble) sur du papier de riz. Produit dans le cadre de Kokugun Zenzu (Atlas du Japon), cartographié et préparé par Ino Tadataka, et compilé après sa mort par Motonobu Aoo et Toshiro Eirakuua. Cette carte est tirée de la version De-Luxe de la carte (la version standard était légèrement plus petite et imprimée sur du papier plus fin). Coloration contemporaine. Un très bel exemplaire propre. Coloration forte. Pas d'éclats ni de déchirures. « Une carte vraiment fine et amplement détaillée reflétant le plus grand crédit sur les réalisations scientifiques des Japonais. C'est la meilleure carte du Japon existante et très rare en Europe ; car il n'est pas autorisé à être vendu à des étrangers ». (Revue Orientale, 1869). Ino Tadataka (1745-1818) était un géomètre et cartographe japonais et est considéré comme l'un des pères du Japon moderne. Ino Tadataka est né à Kujukuri, un village côtier de la province de Kazusa (préfecture de Chiba) à 17 ans, il a été adopté par le prospère clan Ino. La famille Ino était constituée de riches marchands de riz et de brasseurs de saki basés à Sawara (aujourd'hui un district de Katori, Chiba), une ville de la province de Shimo-Usa. Ino Tadataka a servi les intérêts de la famille pendant près de trente-deux ans avant de se tourner vers les mathématiques, l'astronomie et la cartographie. Il a déménagé à Edo (Tokyo moderne) et y a fait son apprentissage chez Takahashi Yoshitoki, un spécialiste en astronomie sous le shogunat Tokugawa. Après cinq années d'études, il a demandé au shogun la permission de cartographier le littoral du Japon en utilisant des techniques modernes et son propre argent. Le shogun approuva et Tadataka passa les dix-sept années suivantes à arpenter le pays à pied. Ce travail monumental a abouti à une carte et à un atlas ultérieur d'une précision et de détails extraordinaires qui seraient la cartographie définitive du Japon pour les 100 prochaines années. Les cartes et les atlas pour lesquels Ino Tadataka serait à jamais connu ont été compilés par ses amis et sa famille et publiés environ trois ans après sa mort. À la fin du XIXe siècle, les cartes d'Ino Tadataka étaient devenues la norme pour la cartographie japonaise et étaient avidement collectées par de riches marchands et bureaucrates dans tout le Japon. L'un d'entre eux, un fonctionnaire de la maison impériale, a en fait réussi à rassembler la plupart des œuvres survivantes d'Ino Tadataka qu'il a stockées dans le palais royal. Lorsque le palais a été détruit par un incendie en 1814, la plupart de cette précieuse collection l'accompagnait.

    (less)
    Book ID: 1741
    View basket More details Price: £85.00
  • New General Atlas by THOMSON, John
    THOMSON, John
    New General Atlas Map of North Africa showing the Routes of Explorers

    Edinburgh: 1821. A hand coloured map, taken from Thomson's "New General Atlas". This shows North Africa (including the whole of the Sahara and West Africa). As well as the hand coloured detail, the map shows the routes of Mr Browne, Mr Horneman, Mr Bruce and Mr Parks. Originally this map was paired in a double page, folio atlas with a similar map for South Africa (not present). 280 x 515 mm (11 x 20¼ inches).

    Condition: This map is in lovely condition. Clean and tidy with a little edgewear / nicking to the edges only (not affecting detail). The colour is clean and bright.

    Book ID: 1533
    View basket More details Price: £30.00
  • Old-World Questions and New-World Answers. by PIDGEON, Daniel
    PIDGEON, Daniel
    Old-World Questions and New-World Answers.

    London: Kegan Paul, Trench & Co, 1884. First edition, hardback. Bound in three quarter leather, with marbled boards, and gilt stamped title to spine. 369 pages + colour folding map to rear. Leather on boards is heavily rubbed, but the contents are quite clean, without markings or damage. Colour map is slightly foxed (see photos). 195 x 135 mm (7¾ x 5¼ inches).
    This late nineteenth century work gives a fascinating glimpse in to the European view of the "American" as a social alchemist, and a glance at "evolution of the American people".

    Book ID: 3597
    View basket More details Price: £35.00
  • Verklaring van Mozes Derde Boek, Genoemd Levitikus by POLUS, Patrick & HONERT, Jaon Vanden & TIRION, Isaak.
    POLUS, Patrick & HONERT, Jaon Vanden & TIRION, Isaak.
    Verklaring van Mozes Derde Boek, Genoemd Levitikus uit de Engelsche verklaringen van de heeren Patrik Polus, Wels.

    Amsterdam: Isaak Tirion en Jacobus Loveringh, 1740. First edition. [Bound with], Verklaring van Mozes vierde boek, genoemd Numeri. Top the rear is a fine map of the journey of the Israelites from Egypt to Canaan by Isaak Tirion. Two volumes bound as one. White leather (doesn't seem to be vellum) embossed design to the front and rear board. titles inked to the spine. small ex libris stampt to the front end paper. The texts are in good clean condition with just a touch of darkening to the paper. Both volumes are 1st editions. Commentary on these two books of the Bible. Each has a half title, and a title page printed in red and black with a vignette illustration.…

    (more)

    Amsterdam: Isaak Tirion en Jacobus Loveringh, 1740. First edition. [Bound with], Verklaring van Mozes vierde boek, genoemd Numeri. Top the rear is a fine map of the journey of the Israelites from Egypt to Canaan by Isaak Tirion. Two volumes bound as one. White leather (doesn't seem to be vellum) embossed design to the front and rear board. titles inked to the spine. small ex libris stampt to the front end paper. The texts are in good clean condition with just a touch of darkening to the paper. Both volumes are 1st editions. Commentary on these two books of the Bible. Each has a half title, and a title page printed in red and black with a vignette illustration. There is also an attractive engraving to the first text page of each volume. A touch of edgewear to the top of the first title.
    Johann van den Honert was an 18th-century Dutch theologian who was one of the most important Protestant reformers in the Netherlands. Honert was a supporter of orthodox Calvinism LXVI, 342, [8], 390 + map 260 by 210mm (10¼ by 8¼ inches).

    (less)
    Book ID: 3661
    View basket More details Price: £300.00